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Archive for Clinical Massage Therapist Training

Super Simple (and fun) Guide to Increase Range of Motion

I’ve had the honor and privilege of teaching creative movement and writing in women’s prisons for the last twelve years. (Wondering what this has to do with massage therapy? Read on!)

One of the units I volunteer in is the Female Sex Offender Treatment Program (SOTP). Yes, there are female sex offenders. When I first learned about SOTP I was immediately drawn to facilitate workshops there.

I approached the program director and she loved the idea. Since most Texas prisons have a strict “No Touch” policy, The SOTP program is strictly cognitive based therapy. The program director knows that these women hold tremendous trauma in their bodies and fervently believes that creative movement classes allow their bodies to speak. . (Nearly 100% of female offenders have been sexually abused in childhood.)

I always start my classes with fun icebreaker exercises. I put on some fabulous African drumming music and have them write their name with their tail bones, their belly buttons, elbows, nose, chin – anybody part will do! Before long, everyone is smiling and laughing and magic is happening behind bars.

Create some magic in your office/clinic! Encourage your clients and yourself to move in novel ways like I described above. The body loves circular and spiral movement which stimulates different parts of the brain and gets us out of linear, sagittal plane movement. When we move in a variety of ways different parts of our nervous system are stimulated, giving us a new sense of ourselves, a fresh identity.

I regularly suggest to my clients to put on their favorite music and imagine there’s a paint brush attached to the body part we’re working with and do the following:

  1. Rotator cuff/shoulder injuries: write your name in script with your elbow. Bend elbow and Place fingers lightly on shoulder. For those with limited ROM, start in the pain free range (example 30 degrees of abduction).
  2. Neck: write your name in script with your chin and top of head.
  3. Hips/lower back: write your name in script with your belly button and tail bone.

GUIDELINES

  • Stay in the pain-free range until the body feels ready to perform the movements with more volume
  • If it hurts, make it smaller. Micro-movements are a great start.
  • It should feel good and be fun!

BENEFITS

  • Increases range of motion
  • Introduces novel sensations in the body
  • Increases proprioception
  • Releases endorphins
  • A wonderful alternative to traditional exercises

The proper way to cough!

I was teaching a Stabilizing the Core and SI Joint seminar recently and learned a valuable cue from a pelvic floor specialist. In the MET correction for and upslipped innominate (when the ilium slips out of the SI joint), the client is asked to perform a hip-hike for eight seconds and cough and let go of the hip-hike. Why the cough? Good question! There are a few reasons: coughing activates the pelvic floor muscles, the transverse abdominis, the anterior multifidi, the diaphragm and the attachment of the quadratus lumborum to the 12th rib. The QL stabilizes the 12th rib during forced exhalations, such as coughing and sneezing. Ever had a client with low back spasms say “I bent over and sneezed!”?

The pelvic floor specialist noticed that the model’s belly pushed out when she coughed. Allowing the belly to push out weakens the pelvic floor and abdominal group. She suggested to cue clients that when they cough the belly should go in towards the spine to properly activate all the core muscles.

This is one thing I love about teaching for PESI REHAB – the interaction with professionals from other disciplines.

Hope this is useful!

Stabilizing the Core & the SI Joint – A Manual Therapy Approach

I’m developing a new course with my colleague, Tracy Firsching, entitled Stabilizing the Core & the SI Joint – A Manual Therapy Approach. The longer I am in this wondrous field of bodywork I am convinced that leveling the sacral base and pelvis is crucial for addressing all kinds of misalignements in the body. Here’s some interesting facts about the sacroiliac joint (SIJ):

Each SI joint is comprised of irregular, articulating bony surfaces on the sacrum and ilium. They fit together like mirror images of a 3D puzzle. This provides stability, strength and restricts movement so that the considerable weight of the spinal column can transfer to the lower body. It also acts as a shock absorber. These surfaces lock into place during the push-off phase during walking to increase joint stability. The SIJ only slides 2-4mm and rotates 1-2 degrees via ligament stretching during weight bearing and forward bending. Movements are a combination of sliding, tilting and rotation. Although normal SIJ movement is small, it is essential for normal pain-free low back and pelvis function. A loss of this movement is common in people with low back and pelvic pain. Twenty-five percent of low back and pelvic pain involves SIJ dysfunction.

There are two forces that help to “lock” the SIJ: Form closure and force closure. Form closure relates to the form of the bones and how they cleverly fit together to create stability. Force closure is stabilization that result from myofascial contraction. The SIJ has NO muscles passing over the joint. Force closure is from muscles increasing tension on the ligaments. In other words it’s an additional system generated by the contractive action of core myofascial units such as the transverse abdominus, multifidi and thoracolumbar fascia/latissimus dorsi (opposite side), hamstrings and gluteus maximus (same side).
When the sacrum rocks forward into nutation, the ligaments around the SIJ and the muscles provide greater stability by force closure pulling the SIJ together. They also increase FORM closure by increasing tension on the ligaments.

Stay tuned for updates about this seminar!
Peace,
Peggy Lamb